Sheryl Kinney
"Ties That Bind"

Pictures

Statement

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Pictures

 

 
(Photos by Bill Crofton)

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Statement

He was of that era when men wore a collared shirt with a tie and a jacket for all occasion Ė business or pleasure. He most likely wore his first tie when he put on his first pair of long pants, thatís how it was in the early 1920ís. He probably wore a tie often; as a student at the university, for those special occasions, as an officer while serving his country, and as a businessman while making sales calls or meeting clients for lunch or dinner. He certainly wore a tie when he escorted his best lady out on the town.

He always looked like a gentleman, dressed in a tie with his suit or sports coat. He looked dignified. DignityÖthat was one of his favorite words. He was a tie man. That is one of the memories I will always have of him. All those ties, each knotted by his hands, worn over and over and at days end, hung on the tie rack ready for the next day. Wearing a tie was a tradition, armor, part of the ritual process to face the new challenges of each day. These are his ties and ties of his sonís, son-in-laws, grandsons, friends and close business associates.

This robe of many ties is in honor of you Pop, I thank you. I miss you. I love you, Sheryl.

Disclaimer: No tie was harmed in the creation of this garment.

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Last Updated April 6, 2013